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George William Peterson III, Bill

Biography to Display: 

George Peterson’s work is characterized by elegant forms and the paper thin walls of his thrown wood fired porcelain and stoneware vessels.

Peterson was one of five Americans invited to have a two year apprenticeship in Japan with 11th generation potter, Seizan Takatori. There he practiced the centuries old Enshu-Takatori style. Work created in this style is known for delicate fine glazes, smooth clay bodies and dignified forms.

After completing the apprenticeship in 1978 Peterson returned to the states, set up his studio with a wood kiln that he built. Peterson produced a body of work that included vessels used in the traditional tea ceremony and dinnerware. 

Public Collections

Public Collections to Display: 

Michele and Donald D'Amour Museum of Fine Arts, Springfield, Massachusetts

 

 

Typical Marks

"Here are photos of George William Peterson III marks: the Japanese symbol, center, denotes wood fired work and the GWPIII surrounded by a rectangular border, right, denotes gas fired works. All use wood ash glazes usually Takatori style." James Schutz via e-mail-June 2015

3 XL Teapot
Date: 1997
Materials: Porcelain
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
Michele and Donald D'Amour Museum of Fine Arts, Springfield, Massachusetts, gift of Mr. and Mrs. John C. Fontaine, MFA-99.C01
Photo: John Polak
Michele and Donald D'Amour Museum of Fine Arts, Springfield, Massachusetts, gift of Mr. and Mrs. John C. Fontaine, MFA-99.C01
Photo: John Polak
Photo: John Polak
Photo: John Polak
Tea Bowl
Date: ca 1990
Materials: Porcelain
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
Photo: James Schutz
Red Bowl
Date: ca 1990
Materials: Porcelain
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
Photo: James Schutz

Citation: "The Marks Project." Last modified October 14, 2019. http://themarksproject.org:443/marks/peterson-iii