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Gary Hatcher

Biography to Display: 

EDUCATION

1976     BFA, North Texas State University (now University of North Texas), Denton, Texas

             MFA, East Texas State University, Commerce, Texas

 

APPRENTICESHIPS & RESIDENCIES

1976-1979 Michael and David Leach, Devon, England

1979 Jean Louis Gaudin, Annecy, France

 

PRIMARY WORK EXPERIENCE

1992-present Professor of Studio Art, University of Texas at Tyler, Tyler, Texas

1999-2013 Department chair, Art, University of Texas at Tyler, Tyler, Texas

 

BIOGRAPHY

Gary Hatcher is known for functional wheel thrown wood fired stoneware pottery: dinnerware, pitchers, cups, bowls, and teapots. Forms and surface treatment are simplified, slips and glazes are used minimally, often in deep earth tones. Work is fired in a Bourry Box wood kiln.

In 1976, Hatcher and wife Daphne Roehr Hatcher, traveled to England for artist apprenticeships, apprenticed with Michael Leach in Devon.

Upon return from England in 1979 the Hatchers established their pottery, Pine Mills Pottery, in Texas. In 1983 they built a 128 cubic foot Bourry Box kiln. Unlike traditional wood kilns, this specific wood-kiln design allows for slight ash glazing. The ash glaze does not dominate the pottery surface. In 1987 a gas-fired 50 cubic foot car kiln was built for bisque and glaze firing. The work produced by the Hatchers was in the tradition of functional ceramics learned in their apprenticeship, however, refined over many years Hatcher and wife Daphane developing their own refined functional wares.          

The Hatchers mixed their own stoneware clay body composed of nine ingredients including four clays from different mines of the Southern USA. Glazes were also formulated at the pottery. All work was produced by the Hatcher’s hands.

After his European apprenticeships, Gary Hatcher and his wife, Daphne returned to Texas in 1979, and set up Pine Mills Pottery. They built a Bourry box kiln, a specific wood-kiln design, which allows for slight ash glazing, but does not dominate the surface. They also fire in a gas kiln.

 

 

Public Collections

Public Collections to Display: 

Bibliography

Bibliography to Display: 

“About Our Studio.” Pine Mills Pottery: Studio and Gallery, accessed Aug. 4, 2021. https://www.pinemills.com/about.html

Michaud, Joyce. “Gary and Daphne Hatcher: Creating a Cohesive Whole.” Ceramics Monthly, Feb.    2004, Vol. 52 Issue 2, p. 50-57.

Korsak, Floyce. “Pine Mills Pottery.” Ceramics Monthly, April 1987, pg. 40-49.

Provinsal, Carrie. “Evolution at Pine Mills: Gary Hatcher and Daphne Roehr Hatcher.” Ceramics Arts and Perception, 1998, Issue 34, p. 40-42.

 

Website(s):

https://www.pinemills.com

Artist's Studio: Pine Mills Pottery

 

 

Center for CraftCenter For Craft

 

 

AMOCA American Museum of Ceramic ArtAMOCA American Museum of Ceramic Art

 

Typical Marks

Two stamps next to each other. First, “GH” in a square. Second, a stylized pine tree, of four horizontal lines, and a vertical line up the middle, in a square. 

1985 - 1989
Casserole Dish
Date: 1985 - 1988
Materials: Stoneware
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
American Museum of Ceramic Art (AMOCA) 2004.2.179, Gift of the American Ceramic Society
Photo: TMP
American Museum of Ceramic Art (AMOCA) 2004.2.179, Gift of the American Ceramic Society
Photo: TMP
1985 - 1989
Photo: TMP
Plate
Materials: Stoneware
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
rosenfieldcollection.com
rosenfieldcollection.com
Bowl
Materials: Stoneware
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Glaze
rosenfieldcollection.com
rosenfieldcollection.com

Citation: "The Marks Project." Last modified March 25, 2022. http://themarksproject.org:443/marks/hatcher