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Linda Arbuckle

Biography to Display: 

EDUCATION

1968-1975 Zoology, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio

1981 BFA Ceramics, Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland, Ohio

1983 MFA Ceramics, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island

APPRENTICESHIPS AND RESIDENCIES

1991 Artist in Residence, Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts, Edgecomb, Maine

2001 Artist in Residence, Archie Bray Foundation, Helena, Montana

PRIMARY WORK EXPERIENCE

1985-1990 Assistant Professor and Instructor, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

1992—Tenured Professor, Ceramics, School of Art and Art History, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

 

Linda Arbuckle is well known for her brightly colored majolica glazed functional ceramics. She uses terra cotta clay fired in an electric kiln. Her process involves the use of underglaze slips that she applies wax resist over before painting on the background glaze color. Arbuckle’s pieces are decorated with floral motifs often outlined with thin black lines.

Public Collections

Public Collections to Display: 

Archie Bray Foundation for the Ceramic Arts, Helen, Montana

Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts, Gatlinburg, Tennessee

Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, Michigan

Jingdezhen Ceramic Museum, Jingdezhen, People’s Republic of China

Lamar Dodd Art Center, LaGrange College, LaGrange, Georgia

Margaret Harlow Collection, Bemidji University, Bemidji, Minnesota

Museum of Decorative Arts, Arkansas Art Center, Little Rock, Arkansas

Northern Clay Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Racine Art Museum, Racine, Wisconsin

Stetson University, Deland, Florida

Weisman Museum of Art, Minneapolis, Minnesota

World Ceramics Exposition Korea International Collection, Inchon, Korea 

Bibliography

Bibliography to Display: 

Adamson, Glenn and Davira Tragin. Tea Anyone?; the Donna Moog Teapot Collection. Racine, WI: Racine Art Museum, 2003.

Adcock, Craig. “Linda Arbuckle, Clary Illian, Doug Hanson, and Chuck Hindes.” Ceramic Art and Perception, no. 83 (March-May 2011).

Arbuckle, Linda. “The Colorful World of Majolica.” Ceramics Monthly 59, no.6 (June-August 2011).

___________. “Answers From the CM Technical Staff.”  Ceramics Monthly 54, no.3 (March 2006).

___________. “Learning to Use Color.” Studio Potter 35, no.1 (2006).

___________, guest editor. “Majolica Feature.” Studio Potter 24, no.2.

Brown, Glen. “Private Gestures.” Ceramic review the International Magazine of Ceramic Art and Craft, no.203 (September/October 2003).

Campbell, Joe. “Why Go to Workshops.” Clay Times 3, no.5 (September/October 1997).

Hall, Sherman. “Utilitarian Clay IV: Celebrate the Object.” Ceramics Monthly 52, no10 (December 2004).

Hopper, Robin. Making Marks: Discovering the Ceramic Surface. Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 2004.

__________. Functional Pottery: Form and Aesthetic in Pots of Purpose, Second Edition. WI: Krause Publications, 1999.

Hluch, Kevin. The Art of Contemporary American Pottery. Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 2001.

Lawton, Jim. 500 Teapots, v.2. Asheville, NC: Lark Books, 2013

Ostermann, Matthias. Masters: Earthenware: Major Works by Leading Artists. Asheville, NC: Lark Books, 2010.

________________. Ceramic Surface Decoration: Contemporary Approaches and Techniques. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002.

________________. The New Majolica; Contemporary Approaches to Color and Technique in Tin Glaze. London, England: A & C Black, 1999.

Phethean, Richard. Throwing (New Ceramics). London, England: A & C Black, 2012.

Ponzo, Angelica, Ceramics for Beginners: Surfaces, Glazes and Firing. Asheville, NC: Lark Books, 2010.

Strawler, Janice. “Full Circle: Majolica Decorating Technilquest.” Pottery Making Illustrated 15, no.6 (November/December 2012).

Taylor, Brian and Kate Doody. Glaze: the Ultimate Collection of Ceramic Glazes, and How They Were Made. London, England: Quarto Publishing, 2014.

Zakin, Richard. Electric Kiln Ceramics.  Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 2004. 

 

CV or Resume: Click Here to Download

Website: http://lindaarbuckle.com/

 

Typical Marks
2014
Long Server: Fall with Green Fruit
Date: ca. 2014
Form: Platter
Materials: Terra Cotta
Method: Hand Built
Surface Technique: Glaze
Clay Art Center, "Lineage: the Art of Mentorship," Sept. 2014, Port Chester, New York
Photo: Loren Maron
Clay Art Center, "Lineage: the Art of Mentorship," Sept. 2014, Port Chester, New York
Photo: Loren Maron
Photo: Loren Maron
Cup
Form: Cup
Materials: Terra Cotta
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Majolica/Mailocia
Courtesy of The Rosenfield Collection
Courtesy of The Rosenfield Collection
Serving Bowl
Form: Bowl
Materials: Terra Cotta
Method: Slab Built
Surface Technique: Majolica/Mailocia
Courtesy of The Rosenfield Collection
Courtesy of The Rosenfield Collection
Serving Bowl
Form: Bowl
Materials: Terra Cotta
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Majolica/Mailocia
Courtesy of The Rosenfield Collection
Courtesy of The Rosenfield Collection
Bowl
Form: Bowl
Materials: Earthenware
Method: Thrown and Altered
Surface Technique: Majolica/Mailocia
Rebecca Sive Collection
Photo: TMP
Rebecca Sive Collection
Photo: TMP
Photo: TMP
Teapot
Form: Teapot
Materials: Stoneware
Method: Thrown
Surface Technique: Majolica/Mailocia
Rebecca Sive Collection
Photo: TMP
Rebecca Sive Collection
Photo: TMP
Photo: TMP

Citation: "The Marks Project." Last modified January 13, 2017. http://themarksproject.org/marks/arbuckle